CME

Childhood Epilepsy: February 2015

Childhood Epilepsy: February 2015

Keck School of Medicine of USC and Pediatric Annals

Instructions

Table of Contents

Paroxysmal Nonepileptic Events in Infancy, Childhood, and Adolescence

Aimee F. Luat, MD; Deepak Kamat, MD, PhD; and Lalitha Sivaswamy, MD

Seizure Patterns in Childhood

Steven M. Wolf, MD; and Patricia E. McGoldrick, NP, MPA

Common Pediatric Epilepsy Syndromes

Jun T. Park, MD; Asim M. Shahid, MD; and Adham Jammoul, MD

Antiepileptic Drugs—A Review

Ram Sankaraneni, MBBS; and Deepak Lachhwani, MBBS, MD

Options for Pharmacoresistant Epilepsy in Children: When Medications Don’t Work

Gregory B. Sharp, MD; Debopam Samanta, MD; and Erin Willis, MD

Sponsorship Statement:  This continuing medical education activity is jointly sponsored by Keck School of Medicine of USC and Pediatric Annals.

Support Statement: There is no commercial support for this activity.

Learning Objectives: 

1. Identify common paroxysmal nonepileptic events in children to differentiate these events from true seizures in order to effectively manage patients.
2. Recognize different seizure types and different epileptic encephalopathies.
3. Describe the most commonly encountered pediatric epilepsy syndromes encountered in the primary care setting.
4. Identify the potentially serious side effects of certain antiepileptic drugs in the pediatric age group.
5. Recognize alternative therapies including ketogenic diet, nerve stimulation, epilepsy surgery, and cannabidiol for pharmacoresistant seizures.

Faculty names and affiliations: See Table of Contents

Reviewer names: Thomas J. Selva, MD, CME Director, Pediatric Annals; Stanford T. Shulman, Editor-in-chief, Pediatric Annals

Guest Editors:  Lalitha Sivaswamy, MD; and Deepak Kamat, MD, PhD

Disclosure statement: In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education’s Standards for Commercial Support, all CME providers are required to disclose to the activity audience the relevant financial relationships of the planners, teachers, and authors involved in the development of CME content. An individual has a relevant financial relationship if he or she has a financial relationship in any amount occurring in the last 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or services are discussed in the CME activity content over which the individual has control. Relationship information appears at the beginning of each CME-accredited article in this issue and also on this page.

Faculty members report the following financial relationships:
Thomas J. Selva, MD, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships. 
Stanford T. Shulman, MD, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Authors report the following financial relationships: Deepak Kamat has no relevant financial relationships to disclose. Lalitha Sivaswamy has no relevant financial relationships to disclose. Steven M. Wolf reports receiving consulting fees from Insys Therapeutics and fees for non-continuing medical education services from Lundbeck A/S. Patricia E. McGoldrick reports receiving consulting fees from Insys Therapeutics and fees for non-continuing medical education services from Lundbeck A/S. Jun T. Park has no relevant financial relationships to disclose. Asim M. Shahid has no relevant financial relationships to disclose. Ram Sankaraneni has no relevant financial relationships to disclose. Deepak Lachhwani has no relevant financial relationships to disclose. Gregory B. Sharp has no relevant financial relationships to disclose. Debopam Samanta has no relevant financial relationships to disclose. Erin Willis has no relevant financial relationships to disclose.

The staff of Keck School of Medicine of USC and Pediatric Annals have disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Signed disclosures are on file at Keck School of Medicine of USC.

Accreditation statement(s): 
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of Keck School of Medicine of USC and SLACK Incorporated. The Keck School of Medicine of USC is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit designation:  The Keck School of Medicine of USC designates this enduring material for a maximum of 3 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Release date: February 1, 2015.

Expiration Date: February 28, 2018.

How to participate:  To participate in this CME activity, you must read the learning objectives, log-in to www.Healio.com, pay for the activity ($30.00), answer the pretest questions, read the article[s], complete the CME posttest, and complete the evaluation. Provide only one (1) correct answer for each question. A satisfactory score is defined as answering 70% of the posttest questions correctly. Upon receipt of the completed materials, if a satisfactory score on the posttest is achieved, you will receive a certificate by email, issued by Keck School of Medicine of USC, for 3 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™.

Payment information: The cost of gaining access to the content of this activity and completing the quiz is $30.00. Upon receipt of payment, you will receive access to the activity. Your credit card will be charged whether or not you complete quiz submission and receive a certificate. There are no refunds of any kind once you submit your credit card information to gain access to the activity.

Copyright Statement: Copyright © 2015 by SLACK Incorporated. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior written consent of the publisher.

Instructions

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