Ace the Case: A 70-Year-Old Woman With a 25-Year History of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and an Elevated A1C

Summary and References

Summary

In the natural history of T2DM, most patients exhibit progressive beta cell dysfunction and loss of insulin secretion over time. As beta cell function decreases, most oral and non-insulin injectable medications become insufficient to control glucose levels, leading to the need for insulin treatment. Insulin therapy remains a standard and effective treatment for achieving glycemic control. The main advantage of insulin over other glucose lowering medications is that insulin lowers glucose in a dose dependent manner to almost any glycemic target. With newer insulin analogs, the benefits of insulin treatment should be more obtainable with minimal risk of hypoglycemia when prescribed appropriately and tailored to the individual needs of the patient.

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